I’ve been undecided about changing my surname, but it means a lot to me fiancé so I’m going to take the plunge and become Mrs Taylor. I’ve not told anyone (well except now all of you!) so for my Marks and Spencer cake I’m going to order a personalised wedding cake topper that says Mr & Mrs Taylor in pale blue and put that on top of the cake, as well as mixing up some blue icing, to dot all over the cake. Then I’m going to do a big ‘reveal’ at the wedding as a surprise for my husband-to-be! I think it would be such a nice wedding day surprise for him and I know the cake will look fabulous. I just need to keep quiet until the wedding day!
It’s impossible to offer a hard-and-fast price list, since each cake incorporates so many variables. We take into account the number of servings, the complexity of diverse design elements, and particulars important to the celebrants. Sometimes a smaller cake may take longer to create than a larger one, and therefore, it will be priced higher per slice (the basis for pricing used by most bakeries). Our cakes are generally baked in incremental serving sizes of twenty-five, but we always try to present several possible variations and propose a few price tiers from which to select. Our minimum order is $800. Pricing for wedding cakes begins at $16 per person. Novelty and sculpted cakes usually start at $1,500.
Some couples go all out buying or renting elaborate cake stands, which are pretty, but not really necessary. Besides, most bakers will provide a decorated base board you can place right on the table. Once you have your cake display, focus on adding to the space around it—choose a fun linen from home, lush greenery, old family wedding photos, candles or flowers to bring some life to the table.
For a bride on a budget, paying a large sum of money for a wedding cake may seem completely outrageous. But what are the alternatives, particularly when you don't have any baking experts in your family? Turns out, making a wedding cake is not as difficult as one might think. There is some significant planning and effort that will need to happen, so make sure you carefully weigh the expense of a cake versus your time (and expectations) as you make your final decisions. And if the cake isn't your thing, you can always serve pie, ice cream, or even an ice cream sundae bar at your wedding.
The biggest misconception about wedding cakes is they're designed to look good but taste like cardboard. As with anything beautiful, it's what's inside that really counts. When you meet with your prospective bakers, taste lots of samples (now, this is research we think you’ll want to get behind). You might be surprised to discover it isn't average cake. Top designers are working with complex flavorings such as coconut and Key lime, blood orange and mango, and chocolate-hazelnut and mocha. You might also go for flavors based on the season, with heavier combinations like chocolate cake with mocha-praline filling perfect for winter weddings and lighter sponge cakes with fruits, curds and preserves more ideal for summer affairs.
Since the wedding cake is such an important part in the wedding celebration, here are some tips you require to know in case you will certainly be acquiring a wedding event cake in the future.

When most of the tots his age were making messes in the sandbox, pastry genius Ron Ben-Israel preferred to observe his Viennese mother’s culinary magic as she whipped egg whites into frothy meringue or transformed flaky crust into ethereal apple strudel. “I was enchanted,” he gushes. “Watching a fruit reduction become a gelée was fascinating. But I certainly wouldn’t have guessed that the art and science of baking would become my life’s passion.”
Once you have a sense of basic costs and your favorite designs, it's time to find a baker. Start your search for the right cake baker online: Read real reviews, browse The Knot Marketplace and ask recently married friends for recommendations. Also, if you’ve booked your caterer, they’ll likely suggest cake pros they know and love to work with. Once you have your top three bakers in mind, set up appointments to meet in person, ask them key questions and check out their portfolios. You'll discuss the time and place of the wedding, the degree of formality, the colors and other wedding details that might inform your cake. Don’t forget to bring examples of cakes you love or even swatches of fabric, art, color combos and more that could inspire the end result.
Sugar flowers are beautiful things. With care and patience they can be delicate fascimiles of real blooms, created using an edible medium which will last for months if kept dry and cool. As well as cakes they can make good display pieces, a sort of floral sculpture. The flowers are made from flowerpaste (gumpaste) , a very elastic sugarpaste that can be rolled and mainpulated into realistic petals that dry hard and brittle.
If your heart's set on flowers, go with fresh blooms or choose flat designs such as painted flower motifs instead of ornate sugar flowers. Sugar flowers are very labor intensive—it can take anywhere from 30 minutes to two hours to mold and dust one pretty sugar replica. (Now you know why they're so gorgeous.) To pare down the cost, choose a simple cake with one large stem or a spray of flowers on a single-tier cake. Another trick is to choose sugar flower types that don't require as much time and detail. For example, skip the cascade of peonies and shoot for hydrangeas or calla lilies. But fresh flowers are one of your best bets for a cost-friendly alternative. Just let your florist in on your plans so they can source pesticide-free and food-safe buds.
Fab post with loads of ideas. I’m. Hoping to make my own New York themed wedding cake using an m&s cake. Plan to use icing to cut out the new York skyline and wrap it around a layer of the cake. Also going to make fondant yellow cabs and the post has just given me the idea to make peg versions of my partner and I – I might try to create a central park scene at the top as that is where we got engaged x
Since the wedding cake is such an important part in the wedding celebration, here are some tips you require to know in case you will certainly be acquiring a wedding event cake in the future.
Once the marzipan is draped over the cake, gently pull down the sides to cover any gaps. Smooth the flat of your hand down the sides, pressing the marzipan to the cake and amoothing out any creases or overlaps, Rub the flat of your hand or a cake smoother over the top firmly to flatten and smooth the surface. Smooth out the sides in the same way. Trim off any excess marzipan around the bottom of the cake with a sharp knife and peel it off the board. This can be kept in an airtight bag or container for use next time.
Almost as much as Ron loves baking, he thrives on teaching. He spends over 30 days a year wearing his professor toque. He is the only Guest Master Pastry Chef at the renowned International Culinary Center in New York City (founded as the French Culinary Institute), where he contributed to the creation of the Cake Techniques & Design program and works with students in the Professional Pastry Arts program. Ron also leads workshops, master classes and personally appears at industry events around the world, including Sugar Salon Paris, Cake Design Festival Milan, LA Cookie Con in Los Angeles, America’s Cake Fair Orlando, Cake & Bake Masters Mexico City, Tendencias in Cartagena, Columbia and many others.

To prepare the cake tin for baking, lay it onto a sheet of baking parchment and draw around the base, then cut out the circle. Cut a long strip of parchment a little taller than your tin. Fold over one long edge of this and cut slits every inch or so. Grease the tin and line the sides with the long strip, laying the flaps on the bottom of the tin. Cover the bottom with the circle. Once fully lined, do this all over again. Double lining the tin will prevent leakage, and give a little extra insulation to the cake.


Almost as much as Ron loves baking, he thrives on teaching. He spends over 30 days a year wearing his professor toque. He is the only Guest Master Pastry Chef at the renowned International Culinary Center in New York City (founded as the French Culinary Institute), where he contributed to the creation of the Cake Techniques & Design program and works with students in the Professional Pastry Arts program. Ron also leads workshops, master classes and personally appears at industry events around the world, including Sugar Salon Paris, Cake Design Festival Milan, LA Cookie Con in Los Angeles, America’s Cake Fair Orlando, Cake & Bake Masters Mexico City, Tendencias in Cartagena, Columbia and many others.
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