This journey has allowed the company to position itself as a leader within the industry and to partner with and promote charities such as City Harvest. Ron and his team enjoy sharing their expertise and techniques through demonstrations around the world and they currently host their own classes for students in the company’s studio+bakery.  (For more information on classes at Ron Ben-Israel Cakes, please refer to Teaching.)
Have fun dressing up your cake table: Drape it with a pretty tablecloth and decorate it with old family wedding photos, candles or flowers (your florist can help). It doesn’t need to be over the top, but don't be afraid to showcase your masterpiece if that’s what you want. For a ballroom wedding, place the cake on a tall, traditional cake stand; go for a wood platform covered in fresh flowers for a spring garden wedding; or try a sleek, clear acrylic stand for an urban loft wedding. And make sure you have a lighting plan: Surround your cake with tiny votives, hang a canopy with twinkling lights over it or place a gleaming antique chandelier above it. Finish off the cake table by covering it with a solid or patterned tablecloth. Beyond showing off your cake baker’s handiwork and giving guests something nice to look at, a pretty cake display will give even better photos of your beautiful dessert.
It would certainly be better to remove it out with your baker how much will be the expense of every decor are added features you wish to add on your wedding celebration cake.
Having a wedding cake at your reception is one of the biggest (and sweetest!) traditions. But what does a wedding cake cost? While wedding cake prices do vary depending on the size and style of your cake, the average cost of a wedding cake in the U.S. is around $500 with most couples spending between $300 to $700. While this may sound like a lot for a dessert, you’d be surprised as to how much work goes into creating a gorgeous wedding cake.
When most of the tots his age were making messes in the sandbox, pastry genius Ron Ben-Israel preferred to observe his Viennese mother’s culinary magic as she whipped egg whites into frothy meringue or transformed flaky crust into ethereal apple strudel. “I was enchanted,” he gushes. “Watching a fruit reduction become a gelée was fascinating. But I certainly wouldn’t have guessed that the art and science of baking would become my life’s passion.”
Our Pastry Chefs will help you select a flavor of cake that is as delicious as it is beautiful.  We limit the number of Wedding cake orders we take to maintain the best quality for your special day.  Since Wedding cake dates book up quickly, we recommended that you place your order as soon as your wedding venue is reserved.  Call (817) 488-7580 to schedule a FREE Wedding Cake Tasting for 2 people.
To prepare the cake tin for baking, lay it onto a sheet of baking parchment and draw around the base, then cut out the circle. Cut a long strip of parchment a little taller than your tin. Fold over one long edge of this and cut slits every inch or so. Grease the tin and line the sides with the long strip, laying the flaps on the bottom of the tin. Cover the bottom with the circle. Once fully lined, do this all over again. Double lining the tin will prevent leakage, and give a little extra insulation to the cake.
Traditionally, the cake cutting signifies the end of the reception is near (and cues any sleepy guests that they can politely slip out), so couples typically wait until an hour or so before the party ends to cut it. But if you don't want to interrupt the dance party, there are several optimal times to cut your cake: Do it at the beginning, right after your reception entrance (aka when all eyes are on you) or directly following the last speech when most people are finishing up their main course. Most important, double-check that your photographer has your cake on their shot list so you get a few photos of the cake (and of you cutting it) for your wedding album.
Almost as much as Ron loves baking, he thrives on teaching. He spends over 30 days a year wearing his professor toque. He is the only Guest Master Pastry Chef at the renowned International Culinary Center in New York City (founded as the French Culinary Institute), where he contributed to the creation of the Cake Techniques & Design program and works with students in the Professional Pastry Arts program. Ron also leads workshops, master classes and personally appears at industry events around the world, including Sugar Salon Paris, Cake Design Festival Milan, LA Cookie Con in Los Angeles, America’s Cake Fair Orlando, Cake & Bake Masters Mexico City, Tendencias in Cartagena, Columbia and many others.
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