What about a sheet cake?  We do offer sheet cakes, and they are a great way to supplement cake servings, without paying for a huge tiered cake with 250 servings.  What I mean by that is, if your guest count is 250, order a smaller tiered cake (the most common size cake we bake is a 3 tier with 80 servings & shown in the photo above) and then supplement the rest of your cake servings with sheet cake.  Sheet cakes are basic frosted cakes, delivered to the kitchen, cut by catering staff, and never seen by guests, therefore they cost less per serving then a tiered cake.  Keep in mind, that we will only make sheet cakes for wedding clients ordering a two tier or larger cake from us.
Not every cake that appears in a magazine is ideal for a real-life celebration. Just as in couture fashion shows, silhouettes are often presented on the runway (in our case, in the press) to illustrate trends, new styles, and fresh ideas. Not every design will scale up or down with success, and some structures require a different minimum number of servings. As always, we’ll do our creative best to present you with a few options and choices.
This journey has allowed the company to position itself as a leader within the industry and to partner with and promote charities such as City Harvest. Ron and his team enjoy sharing their expertise and techniques through demonstrations around the world and they currently host their own classes for students in the company’s studio+bakery.  (For more information on classes at Ron Ben-Israel Cakes, please refer to Teaching.)
Ron’s company maintains an internship program and he and his staff mentor up to 12 interns a year. Aspiring participants who wish to apply to this intense, full-time, non-paying program must be current or recent graduates of an accredited pastry-arts program. To be considered, they must submit samples of their work along with recommendations from a chef-instructor. Interns can expect to work a minimum of three months; they will follow a classic kitchen rotation, which includes stints in baking, decorating, cleaning, and above all, practicing, which Ron says is the basis of all else. He notes that students will leave with a solid knowledge of baking, structuring cakes, and fashioning sugar flowers and confectionery decoration.
When making any flower you start with the centre and leave it to dry hard to provide a stable base for the creation. For the poppies the centre is the seed head. This is made using some pale green flower paste. Either buy the paste coloured or colour it yourself by adding a small amount of green food colouring paste and kneading it through to an even shade. Take a 24 gauge wire and use some pliers to bend a small hook onto the end.
To prepare the cake tin for baking, lay it onto a sheet of baking parchment and draw around the base, then cut out the circle. Cut a long strip of parchment a little taller than your tin. Fold over one long edge of this and cut slits every inch or so. Grease the tin and line the sides with the long strip, laying the flaps on the bottom of the tin. Cover the bottom with the circle. Once fully lined, do this all over again. Double lining the tin will prevent leakage, and give a little extra insulation to the cake.

Our favorite kind of wedding cake is the kind that makes a statement by adding to your wedding décor. For bohemian brides, we’re loving delicate flower wreaths, organically placed leafy vines, or anything with an earthy feel. If your style is more contemporary, a sleek, smooth finish and geometric details, such as a repeated tile pattern, hexagonal tiers, or triangular adornments, will always do the trick. If you’re more of a classic bride, traditional white isn’t your only option; hand-painted florals, watercolors, and subtle ruffles all evoke a timeless touch. And no matter the cake style, gilded accents and metallic foil always add a hint of glam and a dash of chic, while greenery, whether a topper of eucalyptus, cascading foliage, or wreath of ferns, brings organic beauty.


To get the positioning of the other flowers right, carefully place your top tier on top of your base tier. Unless it's been incredibly humid, the overnight drying time should have made the tiers safe to handle without messing up thier smooth surfaces too much. Any small marks can be rubbed out, or covered with flowers or a little imaginative piping.


Don’t forget that the tiers don’t all have to be cake layers as you know them. One tier on top of a tower of cupcakes or macarons will work just as well. You can also try stacking trendy donuts up to create your wedding cake, or copy this couple and go for a Jaffa Cake sensation! Those looking to splurge on a showstopper should surround their wedding cake with a decadent dessert table.
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