We find that standard carriers cannot guarantee the safe transport of our cakes. The best method to deliver our cakes is by cold vans, and this service is available from New York City to most points on the East Coast. Long distance delivery is both extremely complicated and very costly. While we have flown our cakes to distant destinations, it is a highly complex process to engineer the delivery via a private or chartered plane. Additionally, most designs require the presence of a staff member who must assemble the cake on-site.

Besides the blushing bride, the wedding cake is like the centerpiece of a wedding. And rightly so, since it's basically like a piece of art -- well, one that can also be eaten (which arguably makes it the best kind of art). With the right design and flavor choice, we'd go so far as to say a couple's wedding cake is basically like the edible embodiment of the couple themselves. So it's no wonder why people go to such great lengths to make sure their cake is perfect for their style.

Be prepared to pay anywhere from $2 to $20 per slice. Naturally, the more complicated the cake, the more you'll pay. Fondant is generally more expensive than buttercream, and if you want elaborately molded shapes, vibrant colors or handmade sugar flowers, you'll pay for the cake designer's time and labor. One cost-cutting option is to order the cake of your dreams made on a small scale for a price you can comfortably afford, and then order sheet cakes of the same flavor to be cut in the kitchen (some but not all designers will do this). Bottom line: Once you find your baker, you'll want to work with them to come up with a wedding cake design that falls within your budget.
I like to encourage brides to plan on one serving per guest, but if you’re looking to cut your costs you can drop that number down to 20 or so less since not everybody will eat cake, especially if you’re having other types of desserts. But otherwise I would definitely plan on 1 serving per 1 guest. (NOTE: Groom’s cake should be smaller and only plan to serve about half of the wedding guests with it). Here’s a helpful chart that illustrates how many servings wedding cakes typically have per tier:
To cover the edge of the board, roll some fondant into a long sausage, and roll this out into a flat strip. Trim one long edge with a sharp knife to give a crisp edge. Dust the icing with cornflour and roll it up. Brush the board with a little water and unroll the icing strip around it, pushing it up to meet the bottom edge of the cake. Cut the strip when it meets the first end, and smooth out the join with your fingertips. Using you hand or the cake smoother, smooth out the icing on the board, Use a sharp knife to trim the excess from the edge of the board. Smooth down the edge with your finger tips.

The cake in this instructable is a two tier fruit cake, decorated with gorgeous bright red poppies. This is a design specific to my friends' desires, but I have attempted to expand the instructable to cover making wedding cakes in general, from the ambitious planning stages to the nervewracking final set up. This may have led me to ramble a little more than I should, but buried amongst that are the little tips &  tricks I've picked up a long the way.
Once you have your smooth surface you can take care of any flaws that are left. Marks and cracks in the icing can be hidden by taking a small ball of icing, dipping it in some cornflour or icing sugar, and rubbing it over the problem area. The icing sugar will fill the crack and blend it into the surface, smoothing it out. Other marks such as cake smears or food colouring can often be removed by brushing on a little clear alcohol, such as vodka, and then rubbing lightly with some kitchen towel. Once the liqour has dried smooth out the surface again.
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