Your wedding cake may just be the most significant confection you ever buy, so it's key to know what you're getting into. A good place to start is by reading our top tips from wedding cake bakers from around the country. Next, the fun part (well, besides the tasting), is to start searching through wedding cake pictures to help figure out which wedding cake designs suit your style. From classic cakes to more ornate styles, we have something for every taste – literally! Then check out local wedding cake bakers to find a pro near you.
Have fun dressing up your cake table: Drape it with a pretty tablecloth and decorate it with old family wedding photos, candles or flowers (your florist can help). It doesn’t need to be over the top, but don't be afraid to showcase your masterpiece if that’s what you want. For a ballroom wedding, place the cake on a tall, traditional cake stand; go for a wood platform covered in fresh flowers for a spring garden wedding; or try a sleek, clear acrylic stand for an urban loft wedding. And make sure you have a lighting plan: Surround your cake with tiny votives, hang a canopy with twinkling lights over it or place a gleaming antique chandelier above it. Finish off the cake table by covering it with a solid or patterned tablecloth. Beyond showing off your cake baker’s handiwork and giving guests something nice to look at, a pretty cake display will give even better photos of your beautiful dessert.
My boyfriend and I are actually thinking of customising an M&S cake for our wedding cake – the plan is to make fondant icing safari animals to place around the sides and then we have Ryu and Chun-Li figurines (from the Street Fighter computer game) to put on top to hopefully make it look a bit like a stage of the computer game. It’s not really part of a theme as such, just something that we both happen to love!
We find that standard carriers cannot guarantee the safe transport of our cakes. The best method to deliver our cakes is by cold vans, and this service is available from New York City to most points on the East Coast. Long distance delivery is both extremely complicated and very costly. While we have flown our cakes to distant destinations, it is a highly complex process to engineer the delivery via a private or chartered plane. Additionally, most designs require the presence of a staff member who must assemble the cake on-site.
Consider scaling back on cake slices and see if your caterer can also include a round of sweets to supplement (think: passed chocolate-covered strawberries, assorted cookies or mini truffles). Let your caterer know they should cut tasting portions to about three quarters of the usual amount, and plan to plate your cake slices with the other desserts. Ask your caterer to place slices on a buffet or cake table instead of serving a plate at every place setting—or have the staff bring bite-size pieces right to your guests on the dance floor so they can enjoy cake while getting down.

Another thing to note about cakes, the more detailed the cake design, the higher the price will be.  And, just because a cake looks like a “simple” design, doesn’t mean that it is.  I know there are  many amazing cakes online, and in magazines and with cake artists pushing cake design to new limits, it’s easy to fall in love with so many of the beautiful cakes we all see.  Things like hand painting, edible gold, sugar flowers, tons of little sugar pearls on the cake, all translate into beautiful designs, but also a higher cake cost.  Some of these cakes can run as much as $15 per serving…gasp!  But think about it, you go out to dinner at a chain restaurant and pay $15 for a so so meal, that was probably frozen and took about 20 minutes to make.   A cake artist can spend HOURS from start to finish on your wedding cake, and we think our time is worth it.  Cake decorating is an art and not just anyone can do it.  Not to mention ingredient costs, like fresh fruit, butter and eggs!  That stuff is expensive!

Toppings are at risk to environmental risks. If the baker understands that your wedding will certainly be a yard wedding event or a wedding celebration by the beach, he might make such arrangements with your cake in order to withstand the environmental problems where it will be positioned.
Sugar flowers are beautiful things. With care and patience they can be delicate fascimiles of real blooms, created using an edible medium which will last for months if kept dry and cool. As well as cakes they can make good display pieces, a sort of floral sculpture. The flowers are made from flowerpaste (gumpaste) , a very elastic sugarpaste that can be rolled and mainpulated into realistic petals that dry hard and brittle.

Not every cake that appears in a magazine is ideal for a real-life celebration. Just as in couture fashion shows, silhouettes are often presented on the runway (in our case, in the press) to illustrate trends, new styles, and fresh ideas. Not every design will scale up or down with success, and some structures require a different minimum number of servings. As always, we’ll do our creative best to present you with a few options and choices.
Sugar flowers will always cost more than fresh flowers.  Why?  Because they are very time consuming to make, and require a skilled hand, with knowledge on how to construct, wire, etc. a beautiful looking flower made from sugar!  Sugar flowers can start at about $15 per flower – the more complex the flower design, the higher the price.  As much a I love, love, love sugar flowers on a cake, most couples do not have the budget to spend $200-300 on just sugar flowers alone, I get it!  So, unless you do, opt for fresh flowers instead.
He is a committed member of the Food Council of City Harvest, honored to be a member of this prestigious group of chefs and restaurateurs. City Harvest collects more than 28 million pounds of excess food from countless food-industry sources and distributes it—free of charge—to nearly 600 community agencies, which in turn, help feed over a quarter-million hungry New Yorkers each week.
Almost as much as Ron loves baking, he thrives on teaching. He spends over 30 days a year wearing his professor toque. He is the only Guest Master Pastry Chef at the renowned International Culinary Center in New York City (founded as the French Culinary Institute), where he contributed to the creation of the Cake Techniques & Design program and works with students in the Professional Pastry Arts program. Ron also leads workshops, master classes and personally appears at industry events around the world, including Sugar Salon Paris, Cake Design Festival Milan, LA Cookie Con in Los Angeles, America’s Cake Fair Orlando, Cake & Bake Masters Mexico City, Tendencias in Cartagena, Columbia and many others.
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