Will a faux cake or a faux tier save you money on your wedding cake?  I’m sorry to say, but the answer is no.  It seems like having a chunk of Styrofoam vs. a piece of delicious cake should cost less.  I know logically, it sounds like it should.  So in an effort to dispel that myth, I will explain why it’s not the case.  A faux tier, or cake dummy, as we call them, costs about the same it does to bake the actual cake.  So, no cost savings there.  Second, I personally find cake dummies more difficult to work with then real cake, so I’m my opinion, it actually takes longer to decorate them then it does real cake.  So the time that it typically takes to decorate can actually be longer, which means, you guessed it, no cost savings there either!
We try to accommodate everyone’s schedule, but most appointments are made during business hours, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; consultations and tastings last about an hour. In the busy season (April through June and September through October), we need to concentrate on completing orders, therefore, during that time frame, sessions are typically scheduled from Monday to Thursday, but we can occasionally accommodate a Friday appointment. Unfortunately, because we are almost always in production or on location on weekends, we are unable to schedule a tasting for the weekend.
Another way to save money on your cake is to skip an outer layer of frosting. Naked cakes are not only gorgeous to look at, they're actually pretty practical too. They're a lot less expensive because they use less buttercream and take less time—it's as simple as that. To make up for the lack of frosting on the outside, up the wow factor on the inside by experimenting with unique flavors and fillings, like lemon curd, champagne buttercream or chocolate ganache with toasted almonds.
Wedding celebration cakes have a flair for looking good but ought to additionally be tasty in taste for all visitors dribbling at the mouth awaiting a piece of the action

While the seedheads are drying you can start work on the stamens. These tend to come in bunches of around 100. Divide these into smaller groups of about ten. Take one group, make sure the heads are roughly level, and brush the middle and up to a centimetre from each end with edible glues Squeeze the stamen threads together to bind them, and let dry. Do this with each small group.
The tiers should reflect the number of guests you would like to feed, as well as personal preference. This is another of the often overlooked hidden costs attached to a bigger guest list. Expect to pay more not just for your venue hire and wedding breakfast themselves, but also for larger cakes, more table centres and additional bottles of wine too.

The biggest misconception about wedding cakes is they're designed to look good but taste like cardboard. As with anything beautiful, it's what's inside that really counts. When you meet with your prospective bakers, taste lots of samples (now, this is research we think you’ll want to get behind). You might be surprised to discover it isn't average cake. Top designers are working with complex flavorings such as coconut and Key lime, blood orange and mango, and chocolate-hazelnut and mocha. You might also go for flavors based on the season, with heavier combinations like chocolate cake with mocha-praline filling perfect for winter weddings and lighter sponge cakes with fruits, curds and preserves more ideal for summer affairs.

Marks & Spencer have a range of wedding cakes in all different styles and sizes but we chose to style their budget wedding cake range with prices that start from just over £50.00 for a three tier wedding cake. The beauty of the basic Marks & Spencer supermarket wedding cake is that it’s a blank canvas that you can truly make unique and put your own individual stamp on it with a few simple DIY ideas. There is no limit to the fun and creativity you can bring to it. And that is exactly what we did. When we were asked to decorate the cake in our own individual style we really went to town, we didn’t just create a couple of looks, oh no. We are giving you lovely lot a whole host of do-it-yourself wedding cake ideas that won’t blow the budget and are guaranteed to make your wedding cake rock!

To cover the edge of the board, roll some fondant into a long sausage, and roll this out into a flat strip. Trim one long edge with a sharp knife to give a crisp edge. Dust the icing with cornflour and roll it up. Brush the board with a little water and unroll the icing strip around it, pushing it up to meet the bottom edge of the cake. Cut the strip when it meets the first end, and smooth out the join with your fingertips. Using you hand or the cake smoother, smooth out the icing on the board, Use a sharp knife to trim the excess from the edge of the board. Smooth down the edge with your finger tips.


Let's start with cake shapes. Beyond a traditionally round cake, there are so many other options to consider. Square cakes are a popular choice to showcase a modern aesthetic. But there are also hexagonal, oval, petal-shaped and even triangular cakes with personalities all their own. We’ve even seen asymmetrical or purposely off-center tiers for a whimsical look (Alice in Wonderland, anyone?).
Take a 30 gauge wire, dip it in edible glue, and carefully insert this into the raised ridge. Gently pinch the edges of the petal to give them a little realistic frill. If you have a petal veiner, lay the petal in the venier and press down firmly. This will give the petal veins and contours to make it more realistic, This can also be acheived with some patience and a thin modellling tool.
Upping your wedding cake budget to £300 gives a couple more options. If you’re looking to feed a large wedding party, supermarket wedding cakes are a great fit for this kind of budget. Retailers such as Marks and Spencer and Waitrose offer a lovely variety of wedding cakes that serve up to 120 people. Whilst this is a great deal for couples planning a wedding on a budget, the cakes are mass-produced and are usually limited to basic flavours such as chocolate, lemon and vanilla.

We are very much doing a DIY wedding in a venue which was an old veterinary uni building that now houses a Gin distillery – so naturally we are having a gin themed wedding – lots of juniper berry colours therefore we would love to have a rustic citrusy gin soaked cake with some quirky animal topperd would be amazing- as attempting to make our own might end up a total faliure and we’d not have enough gin left for the cake after trying it!
The cake in this instructable is a two tier fruit cake, decorated with gorgeous bright red poppies. This is a design specific to my friends' desires, but I have attempted to expand the instructable to cover making wedding cakes in general, from the ambitious planning stages to the nervewracking final set up. This may have led me to ramble a little more than I should, but buried amongst that are the little tips &  tricks I've picked up a long the way.
Be prepared to pay anywhere from $2 to $20 per slice. Naturally, the more complicated the cake, the more you'll pay. Fondant is generally more expensive than buttercream, and if you want elaborately molded shapes, vibrant colors or handmade sugar flowers, you'll pay for the cake designer's time and labor. One cost-cutting option is to order the cake of your dreams made on a small scale for a price you can comfortably afford, and then order sheet cakes of the same flavor to be cut in the kitchen (some but not all designers will do this). Bottom line: Once you find your baker, you'll want to work with them to come up with a wedding cake design that falls within your budget.
Having a wedding cake at your reception is one of the biggest (and sweetest!) traditions. But what does a wedding cake cost? While wedding cake prices do vary depending on the size and style of your cake, the average cost of a wedding cake in the U.S. is around $500 with most couples spending between $300 to $700. While this may sound like a lot for a dessert, you’d be surprised as to how much work goes into creating a gorgeous wedding cake.
Have fun dressing up your cake table: Drape it with a pretty tablecloth and decorate it with old family wedding photos, candles or flowers (your florist can help). It doesn’t need to be over the top, but don't be afraid to showcase your masterpiece if that’s what you want. For a ballroom wedding, place the cake on a tall, traditional cake stand; go for a wood platform covered in fresh flowers for a spring garden wedding; or try a sleek, clear acrylic stand for an urban loft wedding. And make sure you have a lighting plan: Surround your cake with tiny votives, hang a canopy with twinkling lights over it or place a gleaming antique chandelier above it. Finish off the cake table by covering it with a solid or patterned tablecloth. Beyond showing off your cake baker’s handiwork and giving guests something nice to look at, a pretty cake display will give even better photos of your beautiful dessert.
Once cooked, leave the cake to cool in the tin. When cool, remove from the tin and place on some baking parchment. Drizzle a couple of tablespoons of brandy (or your other chosen liquor) over the cake and wrap it up tightly in parchment and clingfilm or foil. Every few days unwrap the cake to feed it with another spoonful of liquor, then wrap it back up and return to a safe, temperate storage space.
The biggest misconception about wedding cakes is they're designed to look good but taste like cardboard. As with anything beautiful, it's what's inside that really counts. When you meet with your prospective bakers, taste lots of samples (now, this is research we think you’ll want to get behind). You might be surprised to discover it isn't average cake. Top designers are working with complex flavorings such as coconut and Key lime, blood orange and mango, and chocolate-hazelnut and mocha. You might also go for flavors based on the season, with heavier combinations like chocolate cake with mocha-praline filling perfect for winter weddings and lighter sponge cakes with fruits, curds and preserves more ideal for summer affairs.
The base of any fruit cake recipe is the fruit mix. The cake batter is essentially just there to hold all of the dried fruit together. Although I have provided the recipe I used, as long as you end up with roughly the same total weight at the end you can alter the proportions to your taste. In this recipe I was short on mixed peel and currants, but bulked up with dried apricots scrounged from my baking cupboard. It's a very flexible type of cake.
When most of the tots his age were making messes in the sandbox, pastry genius Ron Ben-Israel preferred to observe his Viennese mother’s culinary magic as she whipped egg whites into frothy meringue or transformed flaky crust into ethereal apple strudel. “I was enchanted,” he gushes. “Watching a fruit reduction become a gelée was fascinating. But I certainly wouldn’t have guessed that the art and science of baking would become my life’s passion.”
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