Flowers can come three ways; sugar, silk or fresh. Silk flowers are artificial, and can be bought from many cake or florist stores. They are very easy to work with, and to reuse, but can look quite fake. Fresh flowers add an instant wow, and can be perfectly matched to the rest of the wedding flowers. However certain types of flowers, such as lillies, are poisonous and cannot be used on cakes. Sugar flowers are handmade from flowerpaste, a very pliable sugarpaste that dries hard and brittle. This can be manipulated and coloured, and if made by a good sugar artist the flowers are indistinguishable from real ones until you take a close look.
While I'd love to go into  the many options of cake decorating, right now I don't have the time, so just a brief mention of royal icing. This is made using icing sugar and egg whites, or from a pre bought mix, and is a pipeable icing that dries very hard. It can be coloured before piping, or painted after, and is great for adding detail such as beads and borders to cake. While I used none on the poppy cake, a sprinkling of piped pearls or a bead border around the top edge can be great for covering up flaws and cracks in the icing, while enhancing the overall look of the cake.

To cover the edge of the board, roll some fondant into a long sausage, and roll this out into a flat strip. Trim one long edge with a sharp knife to give a crisp edge. Dust the icing with cornflour and roll it up. Brush the board with a little water and unroll the icing strip around it, pushing it up to meet the bottom edge of the cake. Cut the strip when it meets the first end, and smooth out the join with your fingertips. Using you hand or the cake smoother, smooth out the icing on the board, Use a sharp knife to trim the excess from the edge of the board. Smooth down the edge with your finger tips.
Ron is cut from that rare cloth—the industry professional who takes pride in sharing his secrets; who delights in watching non-professionals master the basics; and who enjoys mentoring dedicated students, helping to mold their talent. He strives to introduce new ideas to his classes, to instruct students to think creatively when they are problem-solving, and to encourage them to develop a style that is distinctly their own.
Cheap wedding cakes do not mean you have to forgo creativity or originality. You can have a beautiful, elegant, and personal wedding cake while being on a budget. It is a fact that we all can only afford what fits into our budget. But just because you may be quoted the average cost of a wedding cake (1) at $1.50 per slice and $543 for the whole wedding cake doesn’t mean you can afford it.
Passion, indeed. Ron is fervent when he talks about baking and creating his extraordinary confections. His dedication to his art is both reverent and joyful at once: Each time he fashions a cake—and he’s designed thousands of stunning, one-of-a-kind gateaux in his career—he’s as thrilled as he would be if it were his first masterpiece. As Ron cheerily observes, “Each cake is like a performance—my team and I feel like we are attending countless opening nights every weekend.”
When it comes to frosting, you have a number of choices. Buttercream (made from butter and sugar) is smooth and creamy and it stays soft, making it easy to cut, color and flavor. Fondant is another popular option—it's rolled out before it's draped over the cake and makes a smooth, firm base for decorative details. Before you dive into one type of icing over the other, consider the weather (buttercream could melt in the heat and/or sun), your budget (ornate fondant designs can get pricey quickly) and taste preferences.
Sugar flowers, tall tiers and intricate piping can quickly jack up the price of your cake. That's because most cake bakers price their work by "touch time," which is the amount of labor and number of hours spent designing the cake. (There's a lot that goes into this confection—it's way more than just flour and eggs!) So when it comes to choosing your cake style, look for designs you love that don't include any over-the-top add-ons. 
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